The Extent of Damage in Haiti

The Extent of Damage in Haiti

The term “extent of damage” is commonly used to describe the area of damage caused by a storm or fire. It is important to note that the exact extent of the destruction varies, depending on the type of disaster, and it may be difficult to ascertain the exact cost. The government is currently assessing the damage, but it is unlikely to have the full picture until the storm and subsequent rains have passed. Fortunately, the majority of homes and businesses have been spared any major damage.

The severity of the damage varies from minor to major, and depends on the construction materials and density of houses. In many villages, the houses were completely destroyed; in others, only the foundations remained. In addition to this, a few houses were collapsed or damaged, and a few had significant amounts of damage. The Justice Minister’s office is still trying to assess the extent of the damage. But even if the damage is small, it’s crucial to make sure the extent of the damages is properly assessed.

Damage to homes and businesses depends on many factors, including the construction materials and density of houses. Some villages were totally destroyed, while others had only minor damage. Among the most common types of damage are fractures in the spine, femur, tibia, fibula, and pelvis. Other types of damage include fractures in the elbow, wrist, and maxilla, as well as traumatic injuries to the eye and chest.

The extent of damage depends on many factors, including construction material and density of houses. Some villages had complete destruction of houses, with as many as ninety percent of them destroyed. Among the villages with a 50 to ninety percent collapse rate, 32 had at least 50% of their buildings completely destroyed. The rest had damage ranging from minor to major. For those with more severe damages, the fire service has yet to release the precise damage estimate.

The extent of damage varies depending on the type of construction material and density of the houses. In many cases, the destruction of houses was complete, and in some villages, more than ninety percent of the houses were totally destroyed. In the remaining two-thirds of villages, however, the proportion was between fifty and ninety percent destroyed. The majority of the damage occurred in buildings that were constructed of lightweight materials and made of flammable materials.

The extent of damage varies with the type of construction material and density of the houses. In many villages, the houses were completely destroyed; in others, they were only partially destroyed. In a few areas, the damage is more severe. Most victims had no access to water and were forced to wait for hours for help. But there were other cases where the people who caused the disaster were not at fault. In some cases, the victims were even attacked at gunpoint.